Author Topic: Pilgrimage to Rome  (Read 203 times)

HerefordAnn

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Pilgrimage to Rome
« on: Apr 07, 2019, 09:00:44 AM »
Watched a fascinating programme yesterday afternoon (I think it was also on earlier in the week) about celebrities making a pilgrimage to Rome.  They started walking from Switzerland (think Canterbury would have been pushing it a bit for them) and they are all different faiths or one is like me and a non-believer (no offence to those who are  :) ).
Dana (Catholic); Les Dennis (he isn't sure); Brendan Cole (Aethist); Greg Rutherford (Jehovahs Witness); Leslie Joseph (Jewish); the other celebrities I don't know but one is an Evangelical Christian, one a Muslim and cannot remember the final one.
Interesting how they are discussing their faiths etc.  Would be so nice if the whole world was like that  :D
People say that age is just a state of mind. I say it's more about the state of your body.
Geoffrey Parfitt

Traveller

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #1 on: Apr 07, 2019, 10:08:29 AM »
IMO, the world would be a better place if we got rid of religion all together.  Maybe people would get together and solve the world's problems without being burdened with a mythical deity.
You climbed on the ladder with the wind in your sails,
You came like a comet blazing your trail

Raven

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #2 on: Apr 07, 2019, 10:10:00 AM »
IMO, the world would be a better place if we got rid of religion all together.  Maybe people would get together and solve the world's problems without being burdened with a mythical deity.




I agree, Religion has been the cause of most of the problems in the world since day one..


No Ann I didn't see the programme. :)

minniemouse

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #3 on: Apr 07, 2019, 12:45:26 PM »
I take all reality programmes with a pinch of salt.  The participants are aware of the camera and their image and who knows if they really did walk all the way?  Producers manipulate the programme to make 'good television'.  Saying that, I do watch reality TV and if this is a repeat, then yes it rings a bell I did watch something similar a long time ago and it was watchable.   
« Last Edit: Apr 07, 2019, 12:55:46 PM by minniemouse »
I saw an ad for burial plots.  I thought to myself, "this is the last thing I need".

zoony

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #4 on: Apr 07, 2019, 12:51:06 PM »
God forbid...I didn't watch these people when they actually made tv progs and certainly don't watch their very-well-paid antics on such programmes. I'd rather eat my own eye.
'Love' is nature's way of tricking us into reproducing.

minniemouse

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #5 on: Apr 07, 2019, 12:56:39 PM »
Calm down  ;D

I saw an ad for burial plots.  I thought to myself, "this is the last thing I need".

HerefordAnn

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #6 on: Apr 07, 2019, 01:04:30 PM »
I think this is the second series, last year a different load of celebrities walked to Spain.  I have to agree that we don't see 'the whole picture' and it is manipulated, and I don't usually watch reality programmes but thought it was a good mixture and also the scenery was stunning as they crossed from Switzerland into Italy.

People say that age is just a state of mind. I say it's more about the state of your body.
Geoffrey Parfitt

Undercover Pensioner

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #7 on: Apr 07, 2019, 01:05:25 PM »

Will have to see if I can go back and find that Anne; it sounds really interesting.


I have been reading Richard Murphy's blogs for years because of his views on tax in this changing world - not a topic for this thread.  I knew he was a Quaker and, living close to York, Quakerism has been an off and on interest over the years.  In one blog he replied to someone asking him about being a  Quaker.  You might like what he said:


I became a Quaker around the age of 40. I have no clue whether there is a life after death. I have almost no concern as to whether or not there was a virgin birth, a physical resurrection or a feeding of the 5,000. What mattered was the radical message of Jesus the teacher - that he came to give good news to the poor and that we must treat our neighbours as ourselves. I stress that I am quite convinced these opinions can be held without religious faith and I seek to convert no one. But at the same time belief in these fundamental messages is, I think, a matter of faith nonetheless, even if I think that belief evidence based.


I have no doubt that there is something to take from each religion and also things to question.  The greatest hypocrites I have met base their hypocrisy on their faith but then so have the sincerest and most honest people.  The only way to learn is to keep questioning as far as I can see.


Complete article at: https://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2017/12/23/why-i-write-this-blog/
Teaching for our past is easy, everyone tells us how to do it. It's teaching for their future that requires an open mind, skill and knowledge.

zoony

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #8 on: Apr 07, 2019, 04:47:48 PM »
I assume it's the Camino del Santiago? Trying to remember who I read that went to Spain to make that pilgrimage. First thing he did was buy a donkey as a pack animal. It wasn't as keen as he was to see Santiago de Compostela..Lovely, bucolic book. Aha!  Tim Moore.. Steps: Travels With My Donkey..
« Last Edit: Apr 07, 2019, 05:45:44 PM by zoony »
'Love' is nature's way of tricking us into reproducing.

crabbyob

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #9 on: Apr 07, 2019, 05:00:09 PM »
i think your religion is your business, and there is no entertainment value in asking mine....
every hill has a down side

zoony

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #10 on: Apr 07, 2019, 05:26:28 PM »
Then I won't.  ;)
'Love' is nature's way of tricking us into reproducing.

HerefordAnn

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #11 on: Apr 08, 2019, 07:51:42 AM »
Very true that religion is a personal thing, I don't know why I am so fascinated with it all.  I like hearing what people believe in, seeing churches (although that is more to do with the craftsmanship within, ie metalwork, masonry, stained glass etc).
People say that age is just a state of mind. I say it's more about the state of your body.
Geoffrey Parfitt

GrannyMac

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #12 on: Apr 08, 2019, 08:14:02 AM »
Will have to see if I can go back and find that Anne; it sounds really interesting.


I have been reading Richard Murphy's blogs for years because of his views on tax in this changing world - not a topic for this thread.  I knew he was a Quaker and, living close to York, Quakerism has been an off and on interest over the years.  In one blog he replied to someone asking him about being a  Quaker.  You might like what he said:


I became a Quaker around the age of 40. I have no clue whether there is a life after death. I have almost no concern as to whether or not there was a virgin birth, a physical resurrection or a feeding of the 5,000. What mattered was the radical message of Jesus the teacher - that he came to give good news to the poor and that we must treat our neighbours as ourselves. I stress that I am quite convinced these opinions can be held without religious faith and I seek to convert no one. But at the same time belief in these fundamental messages is, I think, a matter of faith nonetheless, even if I think that belief evidence based.


I have no doubt that there is something to take from each religion and also things to question.  The greatest hypocrites I have met base their hypocrisy on their faith but then so have the sincerest and most honest people.  The only way to learn is to keep questioning as far as I can see.


Complete article at: https://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2017/12/23/why-i-write-this-blog/


I often used to go to work meetings in our local Quaker Meeting House. I liked the ambience and the people I met there.  I've never delved deeply into any religious thinking, i was brought up in the (rather dour) Church of Scotland, but haven't attended for fifty plus years.  My children weren't christened, we felt it would be hypocritical as neither of us were churchgoers.


I can relate to the message, we can all be good people without having religious faith.
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Scrumpy

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #13 on: Apr 08, 2019, 09:09:33 AM »



Me and my God have an understanding.. He knows I try to do the best I can.. I always say 'Thank you ' when things go well for me, or when a loved one pulls through something scary. I have ask him for help .   I don't go down on my knees to say these things.. nor close my eyes. I don't need to because  he is listening, whatever...
Don't think of a caterpillar dying..Think of a butterfly living.


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crabbyob

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Re: Pilgrimage to Rome
« Reply #14 on: Apr 08, 2019, 09:36:07 AM »
Granny, did you know the Friends held their first meeting in Balby in Doncaster?
or that the Pilgrim Fathers started their journey from Scrooby about ten miles south of Doncaster...
every hill has a down side