Author Topic: Fourth Test  (Read 4357 times)

Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #45 on: Sep 09, 2019, 08:31:57 AM »
Quite right - and I've often wondered if the American Civil War general 'Stonewall' Jackson ever played cricket!
Mike (actually of of his contemporaries - can't remember who - gave him the nickname for a defence he put up against an attack)
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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #46 on: Sep 09, 2019, 09:22:31 AM »
Never happier than when tracking down trivia. Jackson was given his nickname by fellow Confederate General Bee for an obdurate defence against a fierce Union attack at the First Battle of Bull Run.
Mike
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Diasi

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #47 on: Sep 09, 2019, 11:00:04 AM »
Never happier than when tracking down trivia. Jackson was given his nickname by fellow Confederate General Bee for an obdurate defence against a fierce Union attack at the First Battle of Bull Run.
Mike

Yes, your reply caused me to do some Googling. :)
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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #48 on: Sep 09, 2019, 12:23:38 PM »
Wonderful what one can find, isn't it? I heard the reason for the nickname many years ago, but had to check on precisely how it came about.
Mike


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Diasi

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #49 on: Sep 09, 2019, 01:03:57 PM »
Wonderful what one can find, isn't it? I heard the reason for the nickname many years ago, but had to check on precisely how it came about.
Mike

It's used as a term for a delaying tactic in many different respects.

Why the gay lobby decided to use Stonewall for their campaign is a mystery to me.

But so is using the word gay which meant happy, cheerful & can no longer be used in that context.
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Cassandra

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #50 on: Sep 09, 2019, 01:21:48 PM »
Stokes apart, England’s batting numbers don’t inspire much confidence (although without checking, I doubt Australia’s without Smith are much better).
Burns 293 at 36.62
Denley 205 at 25.61
Root 247 at 30.88
Roy 120 at 13.75
Stokes 354 at 59.00
Bairstow 178 at 25.43
Buttler 130 at 16.25
 
Combine all seven and you get 1517 runs at 28.62. That looks bad enough, but if you take Stokes out the equation, you get 1163 runs at 24.74.
A bit of perspective as to the ‘Smith effect’. In five innings he scored 671 runs at 134.20. In other words, in those five innings he scored 44% of the runs England’s top seven scored in 56! Pretty worrying, although it does demonstrate just how special he is. After all, in those 56 innings, England managed three centuries - Smith equalled that in five innings'
Mike

Afternoon Mike, Splendid statistical stuff, Bill Frindall would be impressed! Overton simply practises the old principal of bat close to pad and front foot as close to the pitch as possible, without stressing your balance. Alan Oakman (Sussex & England), that splendid ex Welsh Guard. (all 6'6" of him) was exceptional at this. Shorter players like Gordon Barker or Harry Pilling tended to go back and across to compensate for their lack of reach. I used to get told by the former "shut the F - ing gate your Lordship!" Funnily Jason Roy has a very good defence, off both feet he just doesn't use it much. Yesterday may be start of his reform for the dying five day arena.

Sometimes having a limited academy of strokes to pick from is an advantage (like Overton). What he demonstrated was application and superb concentration. He took any number of short pitched balls in the ribs and reminded me of Brian Close v's Hall and Griffiths in 1966 (see pic below). He'll be feeling it this morning poor chap, but his determination and spirit are an exemplary example of gritty dedication and something to take heart from. He goes a long way up my short list now for those attributes alone.

Sadly technique and it's application is secondary today where the de rigeur is seemingly to bat regardless to the prime tenets of batting. Unorthodox genii like Smith today or Compton from yesteryear are very rare and so brilliant that they're best left to practice their wizardry for everyone's benefit, for the rest you cant leave a space the size of the Blackwall Tunnel in your gait and expect to live very long at this level. I felt very sorry for Ben Stokes yesterday, I've got out a few times in my career like that and at 6ft he probably felt his bat was far up enough to be out of danger. If you remember Boycott among others used to 'shoulder arms' (raise both arms bat held high aloft). Ben yesterday was half way and just got a toe-snick. True to his spirit this noble Leviathan walked bitterly disappointed, (by the way what a take from Paine).

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Cassandra

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #51 on: Sep 09, 2019, 01:35:40 PM »
My knowledge of cricket in minimal, to say the least, but am I correct in saying that I seem to remember this technique being called 'stonewalling'?

None better as a representative example than Trevor (Barnacle) Bailey or Ken (Slasher) Mackay from Australia. Criticism that the 'paying public only wanted sixes and lots of em' became the thing and the intellect of a sound rearguard action was shunned as boring.

In fact Trevor was so named "Barnacle, or Boil" (hard to get rid of) by the Aussies after his six hour marathon in the match I described above.

Sometimes a five day Test resembles a draw at Chess. For purists its the fascination of batting application v's the bowler and field settings. Occasionally the batter must hit out, over the close fielders or slap one really hard at them to encourage withdrawl - thats strategy, but then back to head down and forward or back and across, playing always with 'soft hands' in these circumstances.
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Diasi

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #52 on: Sep 09, 2019, 01:53:33 PM »
From reading your posts I get the impression that there's a lack a carefully considered strategy in today's test matches.
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zoony

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #53 on: Sep 09, 2019, 02:18:43 PM »
Not so much that Diasi though strategy is a large part of it. We spent some years working hard on the one-day/short form of the game and became World Champions at the cost of our Test cricket skills. The two forms call for a huge amount of work on different areas of the game. Basically whacking and bashing versus technique, skill and patience. Test cricket has been neglected.


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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #54 on: Sep 09, 2019, 02:39:49 PM »
I've started a new thread for the Fifth Test
Mike
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Cassandra

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #55 on: Sep 09, 2019, 05:03:59 PM »
I've started a new thread for the Fifth Test
Mike

Well done for being an optimist Mike :)
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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #56 on: Sep 09, 2019, 09:02:03 PM »
Nil desperandum - that's me!
Mike
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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #57 on: Sep 10, 2019, 07:52:52 AM »
I fell to wondering at how the two top sevens actually compared, rather than my original guess that, Smith apart, not much to choose between them. Proved to be much the case. Australia used nine players in the top seven:-
Harris 46 at 11.50 (two Tests)
Warner 8 at 1.00
Labuschange 291 at 58.20 (two and a half Tests)
Head 191 at 27.29
Paine 156 at 22.29
Khawaja 121 at 20.17 (three Tests)
Wade 201 at 25.13
Smith 671 at 134.20 (two and a half Tests)
Bancroft 44 at 11.00 (two Tests)
 
Overall, that’s 1729 at 32.02, compared to the top seven for England’s 1517 at 28.62. Take out Smith (if only we could!) and the rest totalled 1058 at 21.59– so in just five innings, Smith scored a staggering 38.8% of his sides runs – if ever there was a one man band!
Mike
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Michael Rolls

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Re: Fourth Test
« Reply #58 on: Sep 13, 2019, 10:59:21 PM »
Well, after that 82 – his lowest scorer of the series to date – Smith now has 2,600 at 69.47, a slight improvement. On the other hand, his 12 most recent innings are now 1366 at 113.83. who knows, by the end of the series perhaps we can peg him back a bit more – but even if he records a pair at the Oval, his then most recent 12 will still average 98.00
Mike
Corrected typo in original post - Smith's most recent 12 should have read 1366 not 2366
Sorry about that
Mike
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